Sigma Serial Numbers Lens

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While it was long believed that the serial numbers of Sigma instruments were of little use in dating the instruments (except on the DR-28N and DR-35N, which were assembled and finished in Nazareth in 1981/’82 using Japanese-made parts and marked “Made in USA”), today there is a basic understanding of how they work, based in part on the. The lens I received is a XXmm f/XX lens for my XXXXX brand camera, and has serial number #233XXXX. The lens you received has a serial number which has not been issued by Sigma’s factory in Japan. It appears that the lens you received is a 'Gray Market' lens, and has been tampered with having its serial number changed.

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Determine the age of a Canon lens based on the 10-digit serial number. To age a Canon lens using the 10-digital serial number, we dissect the serial number as follows: DD C SSSSSSS. The DD is the key to the date the lens was manufactured - the production date code. The Canon lens date code chart is shown below. Stolen cameras and lenses for Canon, Nikon, Leica, Tamron, Sigma. Search stolen gear by serial number. Type a serial number of a stolen match.

This is just a guide of what you can expect from looking at the serial number on your Nikon lens. Where To Find an How to Check Nikon Lens Serial Numbers Now that you have some understanding about serial numbers you might be curious about how to check.

When looking at a lens name, there are a lot acronyms describing its features (often specific to the manufacturer).Examples, Nikon:Nikon AF-S DX 16-85mm VR f/3.5-5.6G IF-EDNikon AF-I 600mm f/4D IF-EDNikon AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-EDExamples, Canon:Canon EF 85mm f1.2L USM Mark IICanon 70-300mm f/4.5-f/5.6 DO ISExamples, Sigma:Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX APO DG HSM MacroSigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSMSigma 50-150mm F2.8 EX DC APO HSM IIHow do I decipher these lens codes from different manufacturers? Note: Because of the community-wiki nature of this question, this accepted answer became really long, and difficult to edit and keep current as lens designations evolved. The historical answer has been broken up into individual answers per lens brand, with links to each of the lens brand answers below. Descriptions by Lens Make Brand LensesAll major camera manufacturers offer their own line of lenses. Such lenses tend to follow the most stringent quality guidelines, and often come with a price premium.Off-Brand LensesMost off-brand lens manufacturers make lenses that fit many types of bodies, including Canon, Nikon, etc. (also branded as: Pro-Optic; Rokinon; Bower).Descriptions by Lens FeaturesIf you know what feature you're looking for in a lens (cropped-frame designation ultrasonic motor, low-dispersion elements, image stabilization, etc.), and want to know what each of the brands call that feature, the following answers are organized by lens feature. The top answer covers the decoding of the letters very well.

Here are a few comments as to what some of the features actually mean in terms of consequences of the features. Lenses only for reduced frame DSLRsMost low- to mid-range DSLRs have a sensor that is smaller than a 35mm film frame — sometimes called 'reduced frame' or 'cropped sensor'. So using a 'full frame' lens will mean lots of extra light around the sensor that isn't used. You can makes lenses smaller and lighter by reducing the projected image size to fit the sensor size. However using these lenses on a full frame camera would result in the corners of the image being dark — and mostly these lenses won't fit on a full frame camera.The 'less than full frame' codes are:. Canon: EF-S (EF for full frame).

Nikon: DX (FX for full frame). Pentax: DA (FA or D FA for full frame). Sigma: DC (DG for full frame). Sony/Minolta: DT. Tamron: Di II (Di for full frame)Image Stabilisation/Vibration ReductionImage Stabilisation is also called Optical Stabilisation, Optical Image Stabilisation, Optical Steady Shot, Vibration Compensation and Vibration Reduction.

Does what it says on the tin basically. (Some camera bodies — notably, Olympus and Pentax — have a form of vibration reduction in the body and so don't have it in the lens).

Canon: IS. Fujifilm: OIS. Nikon: VR. Panasonic: OIS. Sigma: OS. Sony/Minolta: OSS.

Tamron: VCFast and Quiet Focussing MotorsThe focussing motors in some lower end lenses can be quite noisy. The higher end lenses are able to (the movements can be more accurately controlled) and are quieter and use less battery. The acronym for it usually includes 'Sonic':. Garageband music recording software, free download.

Canon: USM Ultrasonic Motor. Nikon: SWM Silent Wave Motor. Olympus/Zuiko: SWD Supersonic Wave Drive. Pentax: SDM Supersonic Drive Motor or newer DC Direct Current. Sigma: HSM Hyper-Sonic Motor. Sony/Minolta: SSM Super-Sonic Motor.

Tamron: USD Ultrasonic Silent DriveWeather Sealing. Pentax: WR Weather Resistant or higher-level, AW All Weather (also found on ★ lenses)Lens FeaturesThere are a variety of lens features to reduce (where different colours don't exactly converge) and other imperfections in lens performance.

I've noticed that a lot of lens manufacturers explicitly list the lens element features they use. Canon does not explicitly list every detail about their lenses with their feature codes, however it should be noted that they do use special lens elements. Canon lenses do use the following: UD (ultralow dispersion) Glass, Aspherical Lenses, Flourite Lenses, Diffractive Optics. Canon lenses also use advanced milticoating on both the front and internal lens elements.

Not really sure why they don't publicize that much, but, there it is.–Jul 29 '10 at 17:32. Nikon LensesNikon has two current lines of lens mount systems, F-mount and Z-mount. The 1 NIKKOR (Nikon 1-series) system was. Sigma LensesSigma lenses use the following terms to indicate features of each lens. They differ slightly in how they denote aperture: Common.

XYZmm: Focal length. Fx.y: Maximum aperture (or Fa.b-c.d for variable aperture zooms)Lens Lines:Most Older Sigma lenses aren't designated by a model line.Lenses with 'EX' in the model name are generally considered 'pro grade.' From Sigma's website: 'The exterior of this lens is EX-finished to denote the superior build and optical quality, and to enhance its appearance.'

The Global Vision Series are newer Sigma lenses that are compatible with the Sigma USB Dock that allows the end user to update firmware and adjust autofocus calibration. Sony/Minolta LensesMinolta introduced an autofocus SLR system in 1985 using the so-called ' A-mount'. The system used different brands depending on region – Maxxum in North America, Dynax in Europe and α (Alpha) in Asia.In 2003, Minolta and Konica jointly announced the 'Integration of Management between Konica Corporation and Minolta Co., Ltd.' , following which Minolta became Konica Minolta. In 2005, it was announced that 'Konica Minolta and Sony Agree to Jointly Develop Digital SLR Cameras', and in 2006, Sony announced the 'Partial Transfer of Certain Assets Related to Digital SLR cameras', buying the assets of Konica Minolta Photo Imaging.Sony continued to develop interchangeable-lens cameras and lenses under the α (Alpha) brand, using the same ' A-mount' that Minolta had introduced in 1985.

Sony later introduced the ' E-mount' alongside the 'A-mount', and there are both A-mount and E-mount cameras and lenses in Sony's α (Alpha) system, with both full-frame and APS-C bodies and lenses available for each mount.A-mount lenses can be used on E-mount bodies via an adapter, but the coverage (APS-C vs full-frame) of the lens+adapter combination needs to be taken into account. E-mount lenses can not be used on A-mount bodies.Sony's point-and-shoot cameras fall under the separate Cyber-shot brand. Common. XYZ/x.y: Focal length/Maximum Aperture (or XYZ/a.b-c.d for variable aperture zooms)Lens Mount Type.

A: A Type Mount (introduced by Minolta in 1985 and carried over to Sony). E: E Type Mount (introduced by Sony in 2010)Lens Coverage. DT: Digital Technology (optimized for digital cameras). The DT designation was introduced because of a need to indicate new A-mount lenses with coverage only for APS-C digital cameras. A-mount lenses without the DT designation have full-frame coverage.

Sigma Lens Serial Number Lookup

DT lenses can be mounted on full-frame digital cameras, but used only in 'crop mode'. FE: E-mount lens with Full-frame coverage.

The E-mount system was originally an APS-C system. When full-frame bodies and lenses were introduced, the FE label was used to distinguish those lenses that had full-frame coverage. Lenses with APS-C-only coverage are labelled E instead of FE.

Have you ever wondered how old is your Canon lens? I often get asked if it’s possible to determine the age of a Canon lens. If you buy a new lens from an authorized dealer, the chances are, the lens was manufactured fairly recently. So if you bought your lens new, you have a good idea how old your lens is.

However, most people who buy used lenses really want to know how old a lens is without solely relying on seller’s information. The lens’ manufacturing date can give a rough estimate of how long the lens has been in use for, even if you factor in the shipping and warehouse storage times. Fortunately, Canons has been stamping date codes on their lenses since 1960 and you can pinpoint your lens’s production date, if you know how to decode it. In this quick tutorial I will show you exactly how to decode these date codes on older lenses as well as the new serial numbers.As I have mentioned above, Canon has been placing date codes on their lenses for a long time and previously many lenses had the date code placed separate from the actual serial number. In 1990, Canon started placing date codes on select lenses only.

All ‘ L’ lenses have them. That have date codes post 1990 (if your non-L lens is not on this list, then you are out of luck). I will refer to these date codes as “the old system.” But starting in 2008, Canon created a new numbering system which incorporates production date, internal repairing code and an actual serial number into one consolidated block. And to top it off, it looks like they’ve reset the date count in the beginning of 2013. I am sure that internally Canon has a nice chart on how to decipher each number on the new serial numbers, but they don’t share it with the rest of us, so we have to make a few calculated guesses. I will refer to these big serial numbers as “the new system.” The Old SystemCanon’s old dating system is fairly straight forward, if you know what each letter means.

You can find this code on the inner rim of the lens (the side that attaches to the camera). Here is the date code on my trusty EF 24-70mm 2.8L – “ U T 1009.”The first letter “ U” means that the lens was manufactured in Canon’s plant in Utsunomiya, Japan.

There are three plants which produced EF lenses: U = Utsunomiya, F = Fukushima, O = Oita. Prior to 1986 this letter was at the end of the date code.The second letter “ T” means that it was produced in 2005. You can tell the year by checking your code against the table below.

Canon started with letter “ A” in 1960 and got to ‘’ Z” in 1985, then they went back to “ A” in 1986 and ended the alphabet again in 2011. The reason I know that my lens was manufactured in 2005 and not 1979 (since both are labeled as “ T”) is mainly because this lens did not exist back in the 70’s and partly because the factory code is at the beginning. A2012, 1986, 1960N1999, 1973B2013, 1987, 1961O2000, 1974C2014, 1988, 1962P2001, 1975D2015, 1989, 1963Q2002, 1976E1990, 1964R2003, 1977F1991, 1965S2004, 1978G1992, 1966T2005, 1979H1993, 1967U2006, 1980I1994, 1968V2007, 1981J1995, 1969W2008, 1982K1996, 1970X2009, 1983L1997, 1971Y2010, 1984M1998, 1972Z2011, 1985The next two digits are the month.

01 being January and 12 December. Occasionally, the leading zero of the month is omitted. In my case 10 means October.Finally, the last two numbers are internal manufacturing codes, most likely batch numbers. The New SystemThe new system consolidates the date codes and serial numbers into one string of numbers. And this number is now placed on the body of the lens.

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It looks like this new system was only implemented on lenses that were marketed starting in 2008 and forward. So some lenses that were produced immediately after 2008, but were introduced to the market before 2008, still have the old dating system.To determine the age of a Canon lens based on the new 10-digit serial number we have to visually break down the number into two, one and seven digits: DD A SSSSSSSThe first two numbers DD correspond to the manufacturing date. It starts in January 2008 with number 38. 39 is February 2008 and so on until December 2012 which is 97. Then Canon reset to 01 on January 2013.

Please refer to the table below for all the dates and corresponding numbers.20132014January0113February0214March0315April0416May0517June0618July0719August0820September0921October1022November1123December1224The next number appears to be for internal use. And the final group of 7 digits is the actual serial number of your lens.So following this breakdown you can see on this image that my EF 24-70 2.8 L Mark II lens was manufactured in July 2013 ( 07).If your Canon lens has a date code then you will be able to tell when it was manufactured. However, keep in mind that the production date is only just that – a date when your lens was made.

Lenses can often take a long time to be shipped and then stored in a warehouse awaiting sale. Production date should only be one of the factors determining the extent of how long the lens has been in use for, other factors being the visual condition of the lens and smoothness of operation. For FD lenses, they use different numbering. The first letter in FD numbering correspond to manufacturing year. The next two number shows the month (i.e 06 for June), but sometimes they omitted the “0”. The last two numbers used for internal purposes (maybe the batch number or else). Canon starts manufactured the FD lenses in 1971 with letter “L” to identified the year (therefore, M = 1972; N = 1973 and goes on).Your lens was stamped with U603, so it was manufactured in June 1980 (U = 1980, 6 = June, 03 = internal numbering).

My FD lens 50 mm f/1.8 was stamped U710. Therefore your lens is 1 month older than mine. The same numbering can be use to identify your canon film camera, the difference is they put another letter after the 2 digit internal code. For example, if the serial number of your film camera is M1102F, then it means your camera was manufactured in Fukushima, November 1972 (M = 1972, 11 = November, 02 = internal code & F = Fukushima).But canon reset the numbering in 1986 for their product which explaind above in “The Old System” section. Use the numbering system that i explained in my previous reply, if the product was manufactured before 1986.

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Sigma Serial Numbers Lens Reading Glasses

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Sigma Serial Numbers Lens Canon

Lens Serial NumbersYear
100 000 - 135 0001931
135 001 - 156 0001932
156 001 - 195 0001933
195 001 - 236 0001934
236 001 - 284 6001935
284 601 - 345 0001936
345 001 - 416 5001937
416 501 - 490 0001938
490 001 - 538 5001939
538 501 - 565 0001940
565 001 - 582 2941941
582 295 - 593 0001942
593 001 - 594 8801943
594 881 - 595 0001944
595 001 - 601 0001945
601 001 - 633 0001946
633 001 - 647 0001947
647 001 - 682 0001948
682 001 - 756 0001949
756 001 - 840 0001950
840 001 - 950 0001951
950 001 - 1 051 0001952
1 051 000 - 1 124 0001953
1 124 001 - 1 236 0001954
1 236 001 - 1 333 0001955
1 333 001 - 1 459 0001956
1 459 001 - 1 548 0001957
1 548 001 - 1 645 3001958
1 645 301 - 1 717 0001959
1 717 001 - 1 827 0001960
1 827 001 - 1 913 0001961
1 913 001 - 1 967 1001962
1 967 101 - 2 015 7001963
2 015 701 - 2 077 5001964
2 077 501 - 2 156 3001965
2 156 301 - 2 236 5001966
2 236 501 - 2 254 4001967
2 254 401 - 2 312 7501968
2 312 751 - 2 384 7001969
2 384 701 - 2 468 5001970
2 468 501 - 2 503 1001971
2 503 101 - 2 556 5001972
2 556 501 - 2 663 4001973
2 663 401 - 2 731 9001974
2 731 901 - 2 761 1001975
2 761 101 - 2 809 4001976
2 809 401 - 2 880 6001977
2 880 601 - 2 967 2501978
2 967 251 - 3 013 6501979
3 013 651 - 3 087 0001980
3 087 001 - 3 160 5001981
3 160 501 - 3 249 1001982
3 249 101 - 3 294 9001983
3 294 901 - 3 346 2001984
3 346 201 - 3 383 2001985
3 383 201 - 3 422 8901986
3 422 891 - 3 455 8701987
3 455 871 - 3 478 9001988
3 478 901 - 3 503 1501989
3 503 151 - 3 540 4671990
3 540 468 - 3 583 8301991
3 585 831 - 3 610 6801992
3 610 381 - 3 644 4751993
3 644 476 - 3 677 0301994
3 677 031 - 3 730 2901995
3 730 291 - 3 770 9201996
3 770 930 - 3 818 6241997
3 818 625 - 3 857 8491998
3 857 850 - 3 882 9961999
3 882 997 - 3 912 2472000
3 912 248 - 3 941 4972001
3 941 498 - 3 970 7482002
3 970 748 - 3 999 9992003
4 000 000 - 4 010 6002004
4 010 601 - 4 025 9002005
4 025 901 - 4 034 9002006
4 034 901 - 4 057 0002007
4 057 001 - 4 080 0002008
4 080 001 - 4 100 0002009
4 100 001 - 4 115 0002010
4 115 001 - 4 130 0002011
4 130 001 - 4 210 0002012
4 210 001 - 4 280 0002013
4 280 001 - 4 400 0002014
4 400 001 - 2015

Sigma Lens Serial Number Check

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